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What’s your process for testing a new eye product?

If it’s a totally new formula, then I try it with and without primer (or whatever helper may be reasonable with that product type) to get an overall gauge at what longevity looks like as a standalone product and how it might be extended (if necessary). I’ll also try different application...

— Christine

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Best Blush Brushes | By Coverage (Updated 10/2019)

The right blush brush is really dependent on what product one’s trying to apply! A very pigmented blush often requires a less-dense, more feathery brush for foolproof, buildable application, whereas a lighter or sheerer blush works better with a denser brush.

It can also depend on whether one’s naturally a bit heavier handed or lighter handed, as it may mean that going for a less-dense brush is more or less ideal.

Best Blush Brushes for Sheerer Coverage

When you want sheer coverage blush application, you’re looking for airier, more feathery brushes; they’re less-densely packed with bristles and have a lot of movement.  They’ll work better with softer, more powdery formulas as opposed to denser, stiffer powder products–on average. However, if you have an intensely pigmented blush that’s firmer,

Wayne Goss The Air Brush ($35.00)

It is a small, more paddle-shaped face brush with tapered bristles that come to a rounded edge.  It’s aptly name The Air Brush because it is airy; it’s not densely-packed, so it has a feathery feel against the skin (though not ticklish!).  I prefer using this brush with sheerer formulas or ones that are more powdery but would avoid with stiffer formulas (need something denser for those). Available at a Beautylish.

Sonia G Fan Pro Brush ($32.00)

It is a small, goat-haired fan brush that has a rounded, pinched ferrule where the brushes flare outward to create a gently curved edge. It is incredibly soft and moves fluidly against the skin–no feeling of any individual bristles at all. Available at Beautylish.

Wayne Goss Brush 14 Cheek Brush ($33.00)

This is a longer-than-average cheek brush that flares outward from the base and then tapers toward the last third of the brush head to a rounded edge.  The gradual taper of the bristles and the rounder shape make it excellent for applying intensely pigmented blushes for a sheerer effect.  I’d reach for this over the previous two for any very, very pigmented, more contrasting shade of blush (like a matte red blush for me). Available at Beautylish.

Honorable mention: SUQQU Cheek Brush ($123.60) is an extremely silky, airy brush, but it’s harder to purchase in a lot of countries.

Best Blush Brushes for Medium, Buildable Coverage

In my experience, most blushes have more medium to semi-opaque pigmentation with a moderate hand, so these are the kind of brushes that work well with those. You can use a lighter hand with them to get sheerer coverage or a heavier hand to pick up more product in one pass for more intense color application.

Sometimes, you may find that you like one brush for the initial lay down and diffusion of color but prefer another shape for really buffing and blending out the edges for a seamless result.  I find this to be true with more matte blushes as well as any blush that is a bit harder to blend out.

Sonia G. Face Two ($48.00)

It’s a small-to-medium sized brush with a flatter edge, so it’s almost like a small, buffing brush with good spring and enough fluffiness to make it a really well-rounded tool.  I find the shape to work well for gently patting onto the surface of a product and getting the exact application I want (even sheer, really) and can easily get medium and buildable coverage. Available at Beautylish.

Sonia G. Designer Pro ($46.00)

It’s a slightly smaller-than-average cheek brush, but it’s moderately dense and has a more paddle-like shape (with a soft, domed edge), so it lays down product easily with a few taps but then has the density necessary to diffuse and blend out products evenly. Available at Beautylish.

Sonia G. Sculpt Three ($32.00)

It’s a small, but mighty, smaller fan brush that picks up product evenly and deposits in precisely, which I find perfect for creating intense glow exactly where you want it. Available at Beautylish.

Hakuhodo G5545 Blush Brush ($63.00)

It is a medium-sized, flatter blush brush with a rounded, tapered edge that picks up product well and distributes it gradually and naturally diffused.  I like using this with very pigmented cheek products or more softly-pressed powders.

Wayne Goss Brush 12 ($53.00)

It is more of a classic blush brush; medium in size, moderately-dense, and lightly domed.  It applies color more moderately but is amazing at blending out edges as denser brushes work better for buffing in small circles (but without lifting up base products, as the bristles are quite soft). Available at Beautylish.

Best Blush Brushes for Intense Pigmentation

These are slightly larger, denser versions of the brushes listed in the section above–more rounded, medium-to-large-sized blush brushes. I reach for these when I’m using lighter shades, applying bronzer all-over the face, or if I’m working with a sheerer powder to begin with and want a bit more coverage out of it. These also work well for buffing and blending out color already placed on the skin, where I’ll use a clean one of these style brushes after I used something more precise to apply my blush.

Hakuhodo B505 Blush Brush ($98.00)

It is a medium-to-large blush brush that’s quite dense (but not stiff) with tapering bristles that makes it fantastic for diffusing and blending out blush.   The size works well for those who apply bronzer to a greater portion of the face, though.  This brush is also available in the J-series for less.

Wayne Goss Brush 11 ($48.00)

It is a medium-to-large sized face brush that has a rounded edge, tapering bristles, and moderate density.  It’s actually marketed as a “Buffing Brush,” which is what I tend to use it for–making sure blush edges are perfectly blended and the like.

Best Blush Brushes for Liquids & Creams

Like I’ve found for liquid and cream highlighters, I routinely opt for fingertips over brushes in most instances–they’re efficient, the warmth improves blending, and mean no extra brushes to wash!  I prefer more duo-fiber style brushes and will opt for synthetic for true liquids and creams as they’re more resilient and don’t absorb product.

As I find smaller brushes to be more precise, which is necessary when dealing with liquids and creams, my favorites for blush are exactly the same as highlighters!

MAC 159S Duo Fibre Brush ($35.00)

It is a small-to-medium-sized, domed cheek brush that has more feathery, sparse bristles at the edge, which help with gradual, diffused application.  Available at Nordstrom.

Real Techniques Setting Brush ($7.99)

It’s a small, more precise synthetic brush that works well for applying highlighters to the high points of the face.  I typically use it with liquids and creams, but it could also be used with powders. Available at Ulta.

Best Highlighter Brushes – My Current Favorites! (Updated 10/2019)

There are a few different styles of highlighting brushes on the market, but the most common highlighter brush is medium in size and flares outward from the ferrule and then tapers to a point, which can be more or less rounded.

Highlighter brushes can be less-dense and feel airier or be moderately dense and can almost buff products into the skin. There are also fan brushes, which are shaped like a hand fan, which are often for more diffused, subtler application.

Best Highlighter Brushes for Subtle Glow

You want to look for less-densely packed brushes–ones described as silky, airy, fluffy, or light–as they’ll pick up less product and disperse it in a more diffused manner, which results in a subtle, more gradual glow.  For subtle highlighter formulas, you may still want a more moderate brush because the product starts out subtle, whereas if you’re trying to make an intense highlighter more buildable in glow, that’s where an airy brush excels.

They are ideal for use with softer powders (nothing too dense/cream-like) that have fine to moderate shimmer size (I would not use them with glitters unless it was a more softly-pressed glittery highlighter).

Wayne Goss The Air Brush ($35.00)

It is a small, flatter face brush with tapered bristles that come to a rounded edge.  Despite being flatter, it excels at blending out the edges of various powders on the face.  It’s one of my favorite brushes for all things face, but it is superb for anyone who wants lighter application of their colored cheek products. Available at a Beautylish.

Sonia G Fan Pro Brush ($32.00)

It is a small, goat-haired fan brush that has a rounded, pinched ferrule where the brushes flare outward to create a gently curved edge. It is incredibly soft and moves fluidly against the skin–no feeling of any individual bristles at all. Available at Beautylish.

Chikuhodo Z-4 Cheek/Highlighter Brush ($73.00)

It is an incredibly soft, almost airy small cheek brush that, as the name says, works for blush and highlighter. The squirrel hair picks up less product than goat or other hair-types, so it gives a more buildable, gradual application of product–ideal for light-to-moderate application of highlight. Available at Beautylish.

Honorable mention: SUQQU Cheek Brush ($123.60) is an extremely silky, airy brush, but it’s harder to purchase in a lot of countries.

Best Highlighter Brushes for Moderate Glow

These are brushes that have very soft bristles that naturally pickup a bit less product and give a more diffused application initially, but they still yield a more moderate application unless you have a very light hand.

is a medium-sized, rounded blush brush that I reach for highlighters as well as blushes, so it’s more multi-tasking for me.  I like using this for more diffused application over a larger area or when I’m using a finishing powder.  This is one I often reach for when I use Hourglass’ Ambient Lighting Powders, which I’ll dust over greater areas of my face.

Sonia G. Designer Pro ($46.00)

It’s a slightly smaller-than-average cheek brush, but it’s moderately dense and has a more paddle-like shape (with a soft, domed edge), so it lays down product easily with a few taps but then has the density necessary to diffuse and blend out shimmer evenly. Available at Beautylish.

Chikuhodo Z-2 Highlight ($78.00)

This is a smaller, tapered highlighter brush designed for more precise application with squirrel hair, which results in a softer, more diffused application compared to other hair types.  Available at Beautylish.

Wayne Goss Brush 10 ($38.00)

This is a rounded, tapered, highlighting brush with a soft, moderately dense feel on the skin that works well for applying and blending out powders on the cheeks.

Alternatively, Hakuhodo J5521 Highlight Brush ($38.00) is extremely similar in shape, so it is also an excellent choice (I use both). B5521 Highlight Brush ($53.00) is softer (mix of blue squirrel and goat hair) for those who need softer bristles in this shape. S5521BBk Highlight Brush ($47.00) is more resilient and works better with stiffer products with its mix of goat and horse hair.

Honorable Mentions: Chikuhodo Z-8 Cheek ($111.00), Chikuhodo Takumi T-5 ($52.00)

Best Highlighter Brushes for Intense Glow

I’ll often use a more tapered highlighter brush (see above for most of my recommendations) with a slightly heavier hand to achieve a more intense glow, but I’ve also listed some of my favorites that I reach for that are specifically ideal for heavier application of highlighter.  (Also, blush brushes are often great tools for applying highlighter more intensely!)

Sonia G. Face Two ($48.00)

It’s a small-to-medium sized brush with a flatter edge, so it’s almost like a small, buffing brush with good spring and enough fluffiness to make it a really well-rounded tool.  I love it for getting intense, pigmented highlighter application (in addition to using it with blush). Available at Beautylish.

Sonia G. Sculpt Three ($32.00)

It’s a small, but mighty, smaller fan brush that picks up product evenly and deposits in precisely, which I find perfect for creating intense glow exactly where you want it. Available at Beautylish.

Best Highlighter Brushes for Liquids & Creams

I often use fingertips more than brushes (hey, less brushes to wash that way) with liquids and creams as I find application to work quite well either way, but when I use brushes, these have been my go-tos for years.

MAC 159S Duo Fibre Brush ($35.00)

It is a small-to-medium-sized, domed cheek brush that has more feathery, sparse bristles at the edge, which help with gradual, diffused application.  Available at Nordstrom.

Real Techniques Setting Brush ($7.99)

It’s a small, more precise synthetic brush that works well for applying highlighters to the high points of the face.  I typically use it with liquids and creams, but it could also be used with powders. Available at Ulta.

The Best Eyeshadow Brushes I Can’t Live Without (Updated 10/2019)

Best Makeup Brushes for Applying Eyeshadows

The right eyeshadow brush can go a long way for getting the coverage and finish desired in less time, and the key is identifying your own preferences, eye shape and size, and considering how varied (or not) the colors you reach for.

Just because a brush works magic for me doesn’t mean it necessarily will for you, so it’s important to consider what type of bristles you prefer, how your application methods differ (or are similar) to mine, and so forth.

Best Brushes for Packing on Eyeshadow

Eyeshadow packing brushes are designed as they sound: to pack on eyeshadow all over the lid in a concentrated fashion.  These brushes are for someone who wants stronger, more opaque color payoff from their eyeshadow onto their eyelid.

The most common shape is similar to MAC’s 239, which is a slight rectangle shape that’s moderately dense, flat but has a slightly dome-shaped edge that has subtle fluffiness that it can double for blending in a pinch.

A fluffier, more dome-shaped edge can also double as a blending brush in a pinch and can also lay down color into the crease (using the edge to place the color).   Flatter, stiffer brushes are better for applying denser, firmer eyeshadow formulas while ultra-soft brushes are better for more buildable application.

Sonia G. Builder Three ($32.00)Sonia G. Builder Three ($32.00)

It’s ideal to have a brush that’s soft enough not to feel pokey or sharp along the eye socket, but sometimes, “softest” doesn’t translate into “best” for a particular purpose.

Sonia G. Builder Three ($32.00)

If I could only pick one, this is the one. This denser, dome-shaped packing brush has become my current go-to and favorite because it picks up product well, holds it and helps minimize fallout, while delivering intense coverage in a single pass.  The domed-edge works well for sweeping and gently blending colors together on the lid or to deposit intense color into the crease. Available at Beautylish.

Smith Cosmetics 253 Laydown BrushSmith Cosmetics 253 Laydown Brush

Smith 253 Laydown Eyeshadow Brush Small ($22.00)

It is a small-to-medium sized brush with a tapered, arrow-shaped edge that makes applying color to the lid a cinch as the shape fits in well into the inner corner as well as the outer corner.  I recommend this one for firmer, thicker eyeshadows in particular. Smith 256 Laydown Eyeshadow Brush Large ($24.00) is functionally similar but larger, so for those with larger features, this might be a better pick. Both are available at Beautylish.

Chikuhodo GSN-09 Eyeshadow BrushChikuhodo GSN-09 Eyeshadow Brush

Chikuhodo GSN-09 Eyeshadow Brush ($25.00)

I’d recommend this for someone who needs very soft bristles or often works with more powdery products or has a lighter hand.  Available at Beautylish.

Hakuhodo J242 Eye Shadow BrushHakuhodo J242 Eye Shadow Brush

Hakuhodo J242 Eye Shadow Brush ($18.00)

This brush works well for getting color onto the inner area of my lid and for someone with smaller features, as it is smaller, a bit firmer/flatter, but still offers the flexibility of the brushes listed above. Hakuhodo J004 Eye Shadow Brush ($20.00) is a lightly fluffed-up, dome-shaped brush with a flatter shape, but it has just enough spring and give to apply eyeshadow to the lid as well as to lightly blend edges or place color into the crease.  For those who need ultra-soft bristles, consider Hakuhodo S133 Eye Shadow Brush ($35.00). Available at Hakuhodo.

Zoeva 234 Luxe Smoky Shader ($11.50)

For a brush that’s more affordable (relative to other recommendations), this is my pick; I still use it from time to time for firmer/stiffer eyeshadows. It’s very comparable shape and feel to the MAC 239.  Available at Zoeva.

Best Crease Brushes

I love a good crease brush!  There are so many to choose from that I think one really has to consider how they apply color into their crease.  If you tend to go for a more defined crease, looking for a tapered crease brush that comes to a more noticeable point (rather than one that is wider, fluffier, or rounded) that is smaller rather than larger will be your best bet.

If you want a really diffused, blown out crease color, a fluffier, more rounded crease brush will get the job done.  I warn those new to crease brushes to carefully consider the size of their crease and the brush you have your eye on. Too small can result in very precise color application that requires a lot of blending but too large can mean color that nearly goes up to the brow bone too quickly!

Wayne Goss Brush 20Wayne Goss Brush 20 ($22.00)

Wayne Goss Brush 20 ($22.00) / Hakuhodo J5529 ($17.00)

It’s a small, tapered crease brush with a more rounded edge, so it deposits intense color but also diffuses and blends in circular motions easily.  I also use the Brush 19, which is more tapered at the tip, so the lay down of color can be a bit sharper and ideal for getting rich color deposit into the deeper areas of the crease. Available at Beautylish.

If you’re shopping Hakuhodo, I find that the Hakuhodo J5529 Brush ($17.00) is nearly identical and slightly cheaper (excluding shipping costs, hence if you’re already placing an order…).  I use it interchangeably with the Brush 19.

Wayne Goss Brush 17Wayne Goss Brush 17

Wayne Goss Brush 17 ($28.00) / Hakuhodo J142 ($19.00)

For a more medium-sized, tapered crease brush, this slightly fluffy take on it works well to blow out color, like transition shades, and really buff the edges of eyeshadow above the crease. If you want a larger, tapered crease brush, try Brush 16, which is a larger version of the 17 (slightly fluffier, too). Available at Beautylish.

Hakuhodo J142 Eye Shadow Brush ($19.00), which is very comparable in shape, and an honorable mention to Hakuhodo J146 Eye Shadow Brush ($18.00), which is slightly more tapered.

Best Eyeshadow Blending Brushes

The typical blending brush was made famous by MAC’s 217 brush (which is now discontinued and has been redone as fully synthetic but the shape did change a bit).  It’s not so dense, fluffy, and has more surface area at the edge so it can buff and soften edges with ease. The goal for a blending brush is to be medium in size with less densely-packed bristles and a lot of fluffiness along the edges, which helps to spread and diffuse color without lifting it completely.

Sonia G. Worker Three BrushSonia G. Worker Three Brush

Sonia G. Worker Three Brush ($32.00)

For really tough-to-blend formulas, this is the magic tool to use; it’s much, much denser than the typical blending brush but I feel like I have to use less pressure and can get more precision out of blending, so sometimes it helps avoid over-blending. It also works well for depositing color into the inner tear duct, especially when working with glittery shades! The Worker One and Worker Two are both larger, and I use all three, but I prefer the smaller size of Worker Three overall (more versatile). All three brushes are available at Beautylish.

The Worker Pro ($30.00) is most comparable to the original MAC 217 but has a more defined edge, so it offers more precision and less fluff in comparison.

Wayne Goss Brush 18 Eye Shadow Blending BrushWayne Goss Brush 18 Eye Shadow Blending Brush

Wayne Goss Brush 18 ($27.00) / Hakuhodo J5523 Brush ($19.00)

It’s a medium-sized, fluffy blending brush with a domed edge and is really a softer, better version of the signature MAC 217.  You can find it at Beautylish.

Alternatively, Hakuhodo J5523 Eye Shadow Brush ($19.00) is nearly identical and is slightly cheaper (excluding shipping). Its firmer, denser sister, S5523, may work better for someone with a lighter hand and has trouble using enough pressure to blend products together; it can also be used with cream and liquid products.

Smith Cosmetics 220 Eyeshadow Finishing BrushSmith Cosmetics 220 Eyeshadow Finishing Brush

Smith 220 Eyeshadow Finishing Brush ($24.00)

This unique shape works well for diffusing and pulling color outward from an area with greater precision than traditional, fluffy blending brushes (like the ones listed above).  Available at Beautylish.

Charlotte Tilbury Magic Star Highlighter Review & Swatches

Magic Star

Charlotte Tilbury Magic Star Magic Star Highlighter ($45.00 for 0.35 oz.) is a rich, medium-dark gold with strong, warm undertones and a lightly sparkling, metallic finish. It had opaque pigmentation in a single layer, while the texture was smooth to the touch, dense without being too firmly-pressed in the pan but had no powderiness at all.

It had more of the gel-powder, almost baked-like feel to it, so it played best with moderately dense brushes (over something like a fan brush, which is very feathery). It could be picked up with a lighter hand or diffused in a soft, buffing motion for sheerer coverage if preferred. The powder applied evenly and blended out nicely along the edges and didn’t emphasize my skin’s natural texture. It wore well for eight and a half hours before fading visibly on me.

Ingredients

MICA, CETEARYL ETHYLHEXANOATE, HDI/TRIMETHYLOL HEXYLLACTONE CROSSPOLYMER, SQUALANE, OCTYLDODECYL STEAROYL STEARATE, GLYCERIN, POLYSORBATE 20, CAPRYLYL GLYCOL, ETHYLHEXYLGLYCERIN, 1,2-HEXANEDIOL, CHONDRUS CRISPUS (CARRAGEENAN), XANTHAN GUM, PENTAERYTHRITYL TETRA-DI-T-BUTYL HYDROXYHYDROCINNAMATE, SILICA, DICALCIUM PHOSPHATE, SYNTHETIC FLUORPHLOGOPITE, [+/- TITANIUM DIOXIDE (CI 77891), IRON OXIDES (CI 77491, CI 77492, CI 77499)].

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Pat McGrath Pale Gold 002 Chromaluxe Hi-Lite Cream Review & Swatches

Pale Gold 002

Pat McGrath Pale Gold Chromaluxe Hi-Lite Cream ($30.00 for 0.23 oz.) is a pale, white gold with more of a translucent base but was chocked full of both finer and larger-sized sparkle and micro-glitter. It appeared slightly white gold at certain angles and then shifted to a brighter, yellower gold (that was about as “cool” as you’ll see for a gold highlighter) with a sparkling, metallic finish.

It had opaque pigmentation but the cream format made it more inclined to diffuse and sheer out slightly to more medium to semi-opaque coverage. Application worked best with fingertips or fluffy, synthetic brushes, as that seemed to help smooth and diffuse the product without encouraging it to thicken or clump up (a flat, synthetic brush did that).

I recommend using a small amount of product and playing around first to figure out what the ideal amount of product is. When I tried to build up coverage, it often resulted in a thicker, uneven texture that emphasized skin texture/lines as the formula is quick-drying. Heavier application looked drier and more visibly textured, too, so the learning curve on this product might be steep for some.

When I applied it on my eyes, it worked best as an inner tearduct highlighter or all over the lid for a sparkling effect. When I wore it on my brow bone, it was better in person but sometimes looked like I had a bald patch because of the way the light didn’t reflect off of it at all times.

As a cheek highlighter, it blended out without too much effort but I had to be careful applying over complexion products as it could lift them up. I felt like it emphasized my skin texture when worn at medium coverage or higher. It wore around eight hours on eyes and cheeks with minimal migration.

Note: I did experience a significant amount of product exploding from the tube when I first opened it; this tube I unrolled at the end after experiencing the same issue with the other shade. I didn’t experience additional product loss when opened on later occasions.

Formula Overview

$30.00/0.23 oz. - $130.43 Per Ounce

It's supposed to be a "gel-cream highlighter" that has a "glittering effect" that can be used on eyes and face. The brand says the formula can be applied with "finger or a brush" and has "full coverage" and "lasting wear." When the application goes well, they produce a sparkling, glittering effect that twinkles and reflects light, but the difficulty is in getting the application down, which I found to be inconsistent.

First and foremost, I had issues with both tubes pushing out product when initially opened. I tried unrolling the end of the second tube I opened to see if that helped, but it actually made it worse (two to three inches worth of product sputtered forth!). I didn't experience issues with the product continuously pouring out of the tube on subsequent openings. The tubes are on the smaller side (and explain the seemingly "low" price initially) and are more in line with the amount you'd expect for an eye product compared to a cheek product.

The brand recommended to apply with a "flat brush or fingertip" for highlighting the eyes; "brush or fingertips" for the face; and "fingertip" or "fluffy brush" for highlighting the cupid's bow (for lips). My personal experience found that they applied best with fluffier, synthetic brushes or fingertips over flat, firmer synthetic brushes, which seemed to push product around rather than diffuse it.

The product has much larger sparkles and micro-glitters in it (and doesn't contain any plastic glitter from what I saw in the ingredient list), so if you loathe glitter or more textured finishes, I'd skip and fine something with a more pearlescent finish instead. They were fairly pigmented and could be sheered out, and the nature of a cream-based product was that they tended to sheer out more than they did build up.

It has a creamy texture with a drier finish, especially as dries down and sets, to the point where too much blending post-dry down could result in product flaking off. For the most part, once applied and set, I didn't notice any fallout over time, and I had light creasing after eight hours of wear. They dry down fairly quickly, which was useful for working on my eyes but less desired no my cheeks. I felt like there was some lifting of base products when I patted the highlighters (with fingertips) on top of my complexion products, and on bare skin, they were slightly patchy and tended to emphasize my skin texture somewhat.

Both shades were smoother, more even, and less prone to emphasizing skin texture/lines when sheered out somewhat, and I would resist the urge to build up to avoid the texture becoming thick, uneven, and almost "cracked" in places (especially notice on my lid area).

Browse all of our Pat McGrath Chromaluxe Hi-Lite Cream swatches.

Ingredients

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ColourPop Launches Three Eyeshadow Palettes at Ulta for Holiday 2019

Release Date + Where to Buy

Get ColourPop’s newest 9-pan shadow palettes exclusively at Ulta. Love Bird features romantic pinks and mauves; Night Owl features warm-toned neutrals and bronzes; and Bird of Paradise features warm peaches and corals.

Now online

Products in the Launch

Love Bird Pressed Powder Palette, $12.00 (Ulta Exclusive)

  • Peacocky Shimmering peachy pink
  • Flower Boy Matte hot peachy pink
  • Sing-a-song Shimmering reddish pink
  • Island Hopping Opal with blue and copper shift
  • Cheep Cheep Opal iridescent
  • Indio Soft pink with holographic glitter
  • Side Chick Matte mauvey pink
  • On a Lark Shimmering magenta
  • No Egrets Matte brownish plum

Night Owl Pressed Powder Palette, $12.00 (Ulta Exclusive)

  • Lil Birdie Matte champagne
  • Bird Brain Metallic golden brown
  • Rule the Roost Matte caramel brown
  • Bel Air Matte cool taupe
  • Two Birds Metallic warm gold
  • Sea Stars Matte yellow brown
  • Rockin’ Robin Matte chocolate brown
  • Milli Penny copper
  • Tweet Tweet Metallic plum brown

Birds of Paradise Pressed Powder Palette, $12.00 (Ulta Exclusive)

  • So Fly Shimmering orange
  • Beak-a-boo Light metallic champagne
  • Cage-free Matte peachy taupe
  • Perch Matte peachy pink
  • Wing It Orangey metallic gold
  • Preen Queen Orangey taupe with gold shimmer
  • Golden Egg Matte deep terracotta
  • Pecking Order Metallic coral
  • Hatched Matte terracotta

Huda Beauty Mercury Retrograde Eyeshadow Palette for Holiday 2019

Release Date + Where to Buy

Embark on a new journey through space with the HUDA BEAUTY Mercury Retrograde eyeshadow palette. This palette will take you to infinity and beyond with 18 incredible galactic inspired colors and textures to deliver infinite possibilities.

The carefully-curated palette is filled with easy-to-use combinations—from dusty coppers, rosy pinks, golden taupe tones with pops of purple and blue. The palette features a cosmic blend of whimsical fantasy like shades, balancing cool and warm tones to complement the best of the intergalactic world.

Featuring 9 buttery mattes, 6 high-shine creamy metallics saturated with electrifying pearls, 1 glitter powder charged with glass pearls and silver sparkles and 2 sheer multi-reflective shadows for a multidimensional glow.

10/24 at Huda, 10/31 at retailers

Product in the Launch

Mercury Retrograde Eyeshadow Palette, $67.00

  • Cosmic (High-Shine Creamy Metallic)
  • Utopia (Matte)
  • Ultraviolet (High-Shine Creamy Metallic)
  • Nebula (Glitter Powder)
  • Mercury (High-Shine Creamy Metallic)
  • Haze (Matte)
  • Off Balance (Matte)
  • Galaxy (High-Shine Creamy Metallic)
  • Libra (Matte)
  • Crash (Matte)
  • Momentum (Matte)
  • Supermoon (Sheer Multi-Reflective)
  • Vortex (Matte)
  • Hot Mess (Matte)
  • Supernova (High-Shine Creamy Metallic)
  • Karma (Matte)
  • Gold Glitch (Sheer Multi-Reflective)
  • Frazzled (High-Shine Creamy Metallic)

   
 
   
 

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